Friday, December 2, 2016

My Space Ship's Log (1959)



My Space Ship's Log is basically a geography and social studies workbook that they tried to put a "space age" slant on. The graphics are simple and I have eliminated most of the geography. 

My space ship's log. Coral Rupprecht and Marion Kurutz. Kenworthy Educational Services, Inc. 1959. (B-3425) 64 p.

 First we have the Lieutenant's oath and their pilot's license.
 What I find particularly enchanting are the kids in their flying saucer as they move around the continents learning about different countries.
 Not especially scientific, but another way for children to feel they are part of a "space age."


These two illustrations of "space age" camping I especially enjoy.

Friday, November 25, 2016

Seventeen space dawns (1963)



My faithful readers have given me this translated title : Seventeen space dawns (1963).  This is sort of fill-in post since the book is mostly Russian text and I really just wanted to share some of the graphics from this book.


Smurfswacker wrote: 

"The book was written by Gherman Titov, the second Soviet cosmonaut after Yuri Gagarin. The title refers to his Vostok 2 mission, in which he orbited the earth 17 times. The title page identifies him as "Hero of the Soviet Union...Pilot-Cosmonaut of the USSR." The subtitle says "Autobiographical novel."











Friday, November 18, 2016

Highlights Magazine (1956)

June-July 1956

A couple of articles from Highlights Magazine in 1956.  Highlights for Children, often referred to simply as Highlights, is an American children's magazine. It began publication in June 1946. For those of us in America it seemed to be a staple of doctor's offices. I did not know anyone who subscribed individually. At best you can say it was "benign" and not too interesting. However it was something to read and I thought you might like seeing these articles.



 I am fascinated with the "propaganda" aspect of the Chief of the Department of Space Medicine taking the time to help write an article for children.  It seems part of an effort to educate children about a world they would be growing up in soon.
 "Why mice may go to the moon before men"





The second is from Highlights May 1956


While not an article about space it still may be of interested to those of us interested in atomic science as seen from 60 years ago.





Just for fun here is an imaginary being from Jupiter as shown in the June-July issue:

Friday, November 11, 2016

Your Trip Into Space (1953) part 2



Continuing my scans from this fascinating early space book.

They discussed in the next sections the building of a space station.












 An interesting concept, how to turn trash into rocket fuel.

The book continues with a trip to the moon. They evaluate a couple of ways to construct a moon lander.




 I also like this period illustration of watching the moon landing on television.





 I also really like this final closing to the book, with its positive tone that the reader will be part of a future space program.